West Bagborough

  • This cheerful Millennium collage (in the church) shows some of the things that are special about West Bagborough.

    West Bagborough is a mixture of old and new houses, along one main village street. It has an inn, a church, a village hall and two sports fields.


  • The village stretches along the slopes of Bagborough Hill and looks down over the Vale of Taunton towards the Brendon Hills and Exmoor.

    From Bagborough you can see for miles.


  • This old holiday postcard shows a pretty thatched cottage in Bagborough and the view in the distance.

    All the houses, old and new, grand or ordinary, have beautiful views


  • Bagborough House

    The Popham family owned the land here for many generations. They built Bagborough House in a good position to enjoy the view.


  • Little Court

    This is where the Rector of West Bagborough used to live. It is a house with a surprise : the walls of the dining room are covered with paintings of fairies, fruit and flowers.


  • Rock Farmhouse

    There are some old farmhouses on the slopes of Bagborough Hill


Triscombe

  • An old postcard of Triscombe, with the Blue Ball Inn in the foreground. Beyond is Great Hill.

    Triscombe is a hamlet on the boundary between Crowcombe and Bagborough. It is just a farm, a cluster of cottages, an inn and a car park. It is near Wills Neck, the highest part of the Quantocks.


  • Visitors in the 1920s walking up the steep hill to Triscombe Stone.  Now this road is part of the Quantock greenway.

    Although it is tiny, many people come through Triscombe, to reach the top of the Quantocks.


  • Triscombe Quarry

    Lorries used to rumble up and down this lane carrying stone from Triscombe Quarry.


  • Triscombe Stone

    At the top you will find the mysterious Triscombe Stone.


  • Will’s Neck

    It’s a good place to start walking along the old Spine Track, or to get to Wills Neck


Stag Hunting

  • Stag hunting has always been part of life and work in the Quantocks. The Quantock Hunt traditionally met at Triscombe.


  • These modern houses at Seven Ash crossroads were built as a pub. They replaced the original ‘Stag’s Head Inn’ which burned down. Kennel Lane is opposite.

    The staghounds were kept in West Bagborough along ‘Kennel Lane’. The Popham family crest is a stag, and these houses used to be ‘The Stag’s Head’ inn.


  • Triscombe House

    This fine house at the bottom of Triscombe was built for one of the Masters of the Hounds.


  • Stable Cottage

    The use of one Triscombe building has changes as you can see from this noticeboard.