Lady Amelia Ammonite

  • Wheee! Up – up - up ---Don’t you just love riding these thermals! I feel sorry for those little human dots down there on the beach. Whooo…soaring, wheeling, this is the life! Just a minute, the human dots down there are making lots of noise.about something. What have they found? This looks like a job for Ace Quantock Reporter Bill Buzzard! I’ll just swoop down and investigate.

  • Well, I can’t see anything special about this funny old stone they were all looking at.

  • Ahem

  • Strange, I thought I heard something, but there’s no one here. Just this odd-shaped old rock.

  • Ahem

  • There it is again. If it wasn’t a crazy idea, I’d say the sound was coming from this peculiar boulder.

  • AHEM! Peculiar boulder? That’s no way to address an ancient aristocratic ammonite, you, you feathery flying reptile!! Just because I’ve been dead since the Jurassic doesn’t mean you can’t treat me with respect… Really! Young people these days!

  • Well, ruffle my feathers, a talking fossil! S-sorry your ladyship.

  • That’s better. Lady Amelia to you. And you are…?

  • Bill Buzzard, Quantock Reporter, at your service. What a scoop! I’ve never interviewed an ammonite before. I mean, aren’t you extinct!

  • Sad. But true. Indeed, more than 150 million years have passed since I myself was swimming through the Quantock Seas..

  • Don’t you mean the Quantock Hills your ladyship?

  • Don’t interrupt! To continue..….swimming through the Quantock Seas, elegantly waving my tentacles, savouring tasty morsals of seafood as they floated into my open mouth, my exquisite coiled shell the envy of all.

  • But you’d sink straight to the bottom in that heavy shell! It must weigh a ton!

  • My dear, ignorant buzzard, I wasn’t always made of stone. My shell was like the others you see today on the beach, fragile and delicate! And of course, in my case, utterly marvellous

  • You mean you’re a mollusc! A sort of enormous snail!

  • Well, I’m only very distantly related to the Snails. Our closer relatives are the Squids and Octopuses. Do you know them?

  • Er, No.

  • Of course, ours is a most ancient family going back 400 million years. Each branch with its distinctive style of shell. Geologists used ammonites to distinguish different layers of rocks.

  • Well, I didn’t know that!

  • Why doesn’t that surprise me? Yes, we Ammonites were vital to understanding the history of the Earth itself! And even now, at our enormous age, we polish up beautifully, and are still greatly in demand. Now young Mr Bill I feel in need of a nap. If you’re still here in a few thousand years time we can talk again. Goodnight.

  • Goodnight, Lady Amelia. And thank you very much, your ladyship. And I think you’re a very nice old fossil! Wheee!!!! Bill Buzzard and the Ammonite!! What a scoop!